Foals, PJ Harvey, Battles and more

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You’ll want these records in your collection…

In this fast-paced musical landscape, where it’s so easy to simply put a playlist on shuffle, nothing compares to putting a record on, sitting back and enjoying all it has to offer in full (or at least until you have get up again to flip it over).

Every week, NME will round up the best vinyl releases, available to buy or pre-order via Norman Records. Check out the best from this week below.

Foals – ‘Everything Not Saved Will Be Lost: Part 2’

NME say:

Foals’ plan to release a two-part album was a bold gamble, but one that’s certainly paid off. “While ‘Part 1’ explored Foals’ new-wave tendencies, Part 2’ is more brutal and visceral. It’s noisier and gnarlier,” writes NME’s Andrew Trendell in our review of the LP, adding that the second-part is “a thoroughbred belter of a record and utterly complete album in its own right… testament to all that Foals are capable of – in sound, in scope and in greatness.”

Norman Records say:

The days when Foals made the sort of short-circuiting post-punk that had them briefly touted as a math-rock band are long gone. As anyone who’s checked in with the group’s last few records can attest, Yannis et al now deal in a brand of meaty stadium-rock. ‘Everything Not Saved Will Be Lost: Part 2’, the companion piece to the ‘Part 1’ that was released earlier this year, continues to lean into this sound.

PJ Harvey – ‘All About Eve (Original Music)’

NME say:

Not quite the Killing Eve companion album we had all been secretly hoping for, but we will have to make do with PJ Harvey’s masterful score of this West End adaptation instead. Of the largely instrumental album (a couple of the tracks feature cameos from Gillian Anderson and Lily James), Harvey says, “I have always loved stories, and so to compose music to support and enhance a story being told is a challenge I enjoy. I also love the freedom that working instrumentally can give me without the constraints of song form.”

Norman Records say:

PJ Harvey seems to have been swept up in all the Eve-xcitement, composing a score to the West End adaptation of this ultra-famous old movie. Ol’ Polly Jean keeps things ticking along nicely, her mostly-instrumental album interspersed with a couple of those Sussex Downs ballads she does so well. 

Battles – ‘Juice B Crypts’

NME say: 

“Complicated music and fun music don’t often go in hand,” NME’s Will Richards argues in his review of Battles’ latest record, ‘Juice B Crypts’, going on to say how the New York band “debunk this fabulously within the first minute of their new album”. Their fourth album and first release in four years, it’s “an intricate and complex album that nonetheless bottles the joy and immediacy of the band’s best work”.

Norman Records say:

Experimental rock enthusiasts Battles drop their fourth studio album, which presses the reset button on expectations once again. ‘Juice B Crypts’ is a veritable whirlwind of sonics and features collaborations with Shabazz Palaces and tUnE-YaRdS.

Queens Of The Stone Age – ‘Rated R’

NME say:

Back in 2000, with just one album to their name, QOTSA were still a band of cult-like proportions, a far stretch from the arena-filling, festival headliners they are today. That would all change with their second record, ‘Rated R’, which is now being reissued on vinyl. Our review at the time stated: “In a world of woeful rap-metal, cyber-goth pap and sanitised skate punk, QOTSA are the band you’ve been waiting for.” And you know what? We weren’t wrong.

Norman Records say:

A vinyl re-issue for ‘Rated R’, an album that’s still arguably the creative high-point for Josh Homme’s Queens Of The Stone Age. Originally released in 2000, the album was a sleek and streamlined behemoth teeming with creativity after the mixed bag of their self-titled debut two years before. Spawning timeless hits ‘Feel Good Hit of the Summer’ and ‘The Lost Art of Keeping a Secret’, Rated R is re-pressed with its original blue artwork, with a 12”x24” insert and international bonus track ‘Ode To Clarissa’. 

Babyshambles – ‘Shotter’s Nation’

NME say:

Originally released in 2007, Babyshambles ‘Shotter’s Nation’ is now being reissued on some fancy marble-effect vinyl, limited to just 500 copies. With Pete Doherty recently telling NME that the currently-dormant group have been “offered some money to have a comeback”, it’s a perfect time to revisit the ramshackle group’s second full-length. As Doherty told us back in May: “Good band, they were – amazing tunes.”

Norman Records say:

‘Shotter’s Nation’ was the second album from The Libertines co-frontman Pete ‘Peter’ Doherty under his Babyshambles moniker. It sees him collaborating with an unfathomably eclectic bunch of artists such as Kate Moss, Ian Brown and Bert Jansch and this is probably the only time you’ll see those three in the same sentence. 

Floating Points – ‘Crush’

NME say:

The last album from Manc electronic maestro Floating Points took five years to make. This latest one? Just five weeks. ‘Crush’ was partly inspired by his improvised sets supporting The xx, as well as the time he played “some of the most obtuse and aggressive music” to an unwitting Coachella crowd, and is intended to replicate “what happens when you’re at home playing music with your friends and it’s going all over the place”.

Norman Records say:

Recorded during an intense, deliberately restricted five-week window rather than the years it took to make his 2015 debut ‘Elaenia’, Sam Shepherd has announced his second Floating Points album ‘Crush’. Inspired by his massive 2017 shows supporting The xx, this record is much more immediate than previous work, as demonstrated by lead single ‘LesAlpx’ released earlier this year. 

Moloko – ‘Statues’

NME say:

The latest in Moloko’s recent vinyl reissue series is ‘Statues’, their fourth and final album, originally released in 2003. The record’s highlight remains lead single ‘Familiar Feeling’, of which we said at the time: “thieving its symphonic psychedelic strings straight from some galloping West Coast folk-rock epic, grafting them onto an Ibizan sunrise, and even boasting a Northern Soul-themed video where a talcum-dusted Roisin Murphy throws some very creditable high-kicks, it’s actually genuinely hard to resist.”

Norman Records say:

Constituting a return to electronic territory after the experiments with live musicians that had made previous record ‘Things To Make and Do’ such a commercial success, Moloko’s fourth and final record ‘Statues’ was an understated and, at the time, undervalued record. Concerning the milestones of a relationship as it grows then dissolves (the group’s Roisin Murphy and Mark Brydon were breaking up at the time) this re-issued 2xLP set on blue and white vinyl ought to do the record justice. 

The Brian Jonestown Massacre – ‘Give It Back!’

NME say:

The ninth track from ‘Give It Back’, the Brian Jonestown Massacre’s sixth LP, sees the band deliver a tongue-in-cheek diss track towards their love/hate ‘frienemies’ The Dandy Warhols, with ‘Not If You Were the Last Dandy on Earth’ a direct response to the rival band’s ‘Not If You Were the Last Junkie on Earth’, which had been wryly dedicated to TBJM. It’s worth a re-listen just for that whole saga alone.

Norman Records say:

Ah what would we do without the Brian Jonestown Massacre. The latest is a re-issue of their 1997 record ‘Give it Back’. This is the one they were working on around the time Dig! was filmed (“man, you broke my Sitar!”). It also is the only BJM album to feature future the Black Rebel Motorcycle Club member Peter Hayes.  

Mark Lanegan Band – ‘Somebody’s Knocking’

NME say:

Who’s that knocking at the door? Just the Mark Lanegan Band with a new album. It’s been a busy few years for alt-rock legend Mark Lanegan too. His last MLB album, ‘Gargoyle’, came out in 2017, while last year saw him collaborating with Duke Garwood and 2019 already bearing the fruits of eclectic team-ups with both Lamb of God guitarist Mark Morton and electronic producer Not Waving. His latest album is now, rather unexpectedly, a love letter to 80s electronic music. Lanegan explains: “I’ve always been into electronic music since I was a kid… I have been a huge fan of New Order and Depeche Mode forever.” 

Norman Records say:

‘Somebody’s Knocking’ is the eleventh solo album by ex-Screaming Trees frontman, Mark Lanegan. Lanegan says that Joy Division, The Stooges, Love and, perhaps surprisingly, New Order have all influenced this album. Despite having always been a fan of electronic music, the sounds are now making their way into his otherwise fags-and-whiskey-drenched gruff rock sound as it’s what he listens to most these days.  

Delta 5 – ‘Singles & Sessions 1979-1981’

NME say:

Cult Leeds post-punk Delta 5 were only together for a couple of years, which may explain why their influence is often sorely overlooked. But with this vinyl reissue of a Kill Rock Stars early-years compilation, you can right this very wrong.

Norman Records say:

Delta 5 were a post-punk band from Leeds. Their sound was very much from the angular funk/punk world that fellow Yorkshire band Gang Of Four inhabited. They combined this with lyrics affirming their political and feminist stance. A perfect match for US label Kill Rock Stars to pick up on. ‘Singles & Sessions 1979 – 1981’ was originally released on CD in 2005. Now they’ve pressed it to vinyl to so you can revel in its analogue glory.





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